Shaker Brook Falls

Description

Shaker Brook Falls, also known as the Cascades on Shaker Brook, is a beautiful 7-foot cascade located just a short walk from the historic Hancock Shaker Village in Hancock, Massachusetts. Parking for the waterfall can be found right along the highway (U.S. Route) where there is a large paved parking lot at the trailhead. Visitors will start out on the Shaker Trail which will eventually reach Shaker Brook after about .3 miles. Continue to walk another .2 miles along the trail adjacent to the brook until you reach the waterfall. The waterfall is marked by a small informative sign. It is unique due to the fact that it flows through an old, broken stone dam that dates back to the 1810s. Although it is not a very large waterfall, it typically flows strong and is a peaceful place to relax and take photos.

The waterfall is officially located in the Pittsfield State Forest which spans 11,000 acres and is managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The Hancock Shaker Brook Village staff also makes an effort to keep the Shaker Trail in good condition and display information about the historic structures along the trail Рsuch as the dams, bridges, reservoirs, mills, and homes. The Hancock Shaker Brook Village currently requests that hikers check in with them at the front desk before embarking on a hike. This way they can provide you with up-to-date information and make sure you have a fun and safe time.  

 

Waterfall Specs

  • Height: 7 feet
  • Type: Cascades¬†
  • Water Source: Shaker Brook
  • Swimming: Not possible

Location

  • Park: Pittsfield State Forest & Hancock Shaker Village
  • Address: U.S. Route 20
  • Town: Hancock
  • State: Massachusetts
  • GPS: Lat 42.438334 Lng -73.340668
  • Parking Notes: Ample free parking is located right at the trailhead to Shaker Brook Falls. There are parking spaces for about 3 dozen cars.¬†
  • Parking Directions: HERE
  • Location Directions: HERE

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