Northeast Kingdom Day Trip Guide

Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom (NEK) is one of the most beautiful regions in Vermont. The Vermont foliage season is a short but glorious time, and it doesn’t take long to make your way up through this region for an enjoyable Vermont foliage excursion. There are plenty of roadside attractions and scenic byways to explore along the way, as well as many quaint towns to stop off at.

We’ve compiled a list of our favorite NEK Vermont Fall sights and activities that we hope will inspire you on your own Vermont foliage roadtrip adventure!

Stop #1

Dog Mountain, Home of Stephen Huneck Gallery

Town: St. Johnsbury, Vermont

Location: HERE

Dog Mountain is a private mountainside retreat on 150 acres near St. Johnsbury, Vermont. People and their dogs are always welcome on the premises. The property was purchased by Stephen Huneck and his wife, Gwen, in 1995. They converted the barn into a studio. The Dog Chapel quickly followed Stephen’s unique visionary experience. In the year 2000, the Dog Chapel opened its doors on Memorial Day weekend.


The Dog Chapel was unveiled as a symbol of peace, love, and memory to the globe. It has evolved into a living work of communal art and history in the 20 years since, with each new remark and photo pinned to the overflowing walls. The Chapel has evolved into a unique and moving physical manifestation of people’s unending love.

Year after year, visitors from all around the world go to the Dog Chapel and the Stephen Huneck Gallery. One of the best times to visit is the fall so you can witness the foliage and seasonal displays.

Stop #2

Schoolhouse Covered Bridge

Town: Lyndon, Vermont

Location: HERE

The Old Schoolhouse Bridge in Lyndon, Vermont, is a historic covered bridge that spans the South Wheelock Branch of the Passumpsic River. It’s immediately south of South Wheelock Road, which it used to be connected to. It no longer carries cars, but pedestrains are welcome to cross through the bridge. It is one of five covered bridges in Lyndon and it was built in 1871. In 1971, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Stop #3

Chamberlin Mill Covered Bridge

Town: Lyndon, Vermont

Location: HERE

The Chamberlin Mill Covered Bridge, also known as the Chamberlin Covered Bridge or the Whitcomb Covered Bridge, is a historic covered bridge that spans the Passumpsic River’s South Wheelock Branch. The bridge is a single-span queenpost truss structure that measures 69 feet long and 16 feet 6 inches wide. The covered bridge sits on stone abutments and it is covered by a metal gabled roof with very long eaves. The date of the bridge’s construction is uncertain. It was noted in a newspaper in 1881, when there was debate about whether or not to cover it, implying that it was built without a roof at the time.

Stop #4

Randall/Burrington Covered Bridge

Town: Lyndon, Vermont

Location: HERE

Built in 1865, the Burrington Covered Bridge is a historic queenpost truss covered bridge in Lyndon, Vermont. Burrington Bridge Road used to cross the Passumpsic River on the 68-foot bridge. The covered bridge does not carry traffic anymore as it has been replaced by a modern bridge. In 1974, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Stop #5

Lake Willoughby South Beach

Town: Westmore, Vermont

Location: HERE

Lake Willoughby’s South Beach is offers some spectacular views of the iconic lake. The cliffs bordering the lake are sights to see and the water is so clear and blue that it will take your breath away. In the fall, the magic of the lake can really be noticed as red, yellow, and orange leaves encompass the lake. The South Beach also links to the South Beach Trails which offer a short walk along Lake Willoughby. The trails offer stunning, shore-side views of the lake and the cliffs of Mount Pisgah on the opposite shore.

Stop #6

Pulpit Rock

Town: Westmore, Vermont

Location: HERE

Looking to see Lake Willoughby and the surrounding mountains from a higher elevation? Pulpit Rock is one of the best spots to go to! The rock juts out of the side of the mountain in a near vertical position to what must be many hundreds of feet below. The rock is located along the trail to the summit of Mount Pisgah. Mount Pisgah is a long hike, but Pulpit Rock is a bit more accessible and quicker. Head to the summit if you have the energy and want some more spectacular views!

Stop #7

Sentinel Rock

Town: Westmore, Vermont

Location: HERE

Sentinel Rock is a massive glacial boulder that stands at 2,034 feet (620 meters) above sea level. The rock is located within the 356-acre Sentinel Rock State Park. The park is primarily undeveloped, although it does have a parking lot, interpretive signage, and ADA-accessible trails that lead to Sentinel Rock and an old farmhouse. It’s worth a visit to see the rock and enjoy the beautiful scenery!

Stop #8

Willoughby Lake North Beach

Town: Town: Westmore, Vermont

Location: HERE

Lake Willoughby’s North Beach is an extremely lowkey beach, especially compared to the very popular South Beach. The North Beach offers unique views of Lake Willoughby and you can really take in the massive size of the lake. The beach is about a quarter-mile long.

Stop #9

Old Stone House Museum & Historic Village

Town: Brownington, Vermont

Location: HERE

In 1925, the Old Stone House Museum and Historic Village first opened its doors. The museum, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, documents Orleans County’s history via its collections, displays, events, and educational activities. The museum tells the story of African American Alexander Lucius Twilight and is a highlighted destination on Vermont’s African American Heritage Trail. Mr. Twilight erected the Old Stone House, which he named Athenian Hall. He was the first African-American college graduate and state legislator in the United States.

More than 75,000 pieces depict the past of Orleans County, Vermont, in the museum’s thirty rooms. Furniture, paintings, utensils, textiles, folk art, and everything else from the nineteenth century are included. Rufus Porter wall murals, a Civil War-era congressional desk, a little Mormon relic from Vermont, and the always popular “phantom baby” photograph on the top level are among the collection’s highlights. Antique agricultural artifacts, horse-drawn carriages, maple sugaring equipment, and other objects are on display in two barns. A lunch on the grounds is a must, and no visit is complete without a walk up Prospect Hill!

Stop #10

Crystal Lake State Park

Town: Barton, Vermont

Location: HERE

Crystal Lake has a length of three miles and a width of one mile. It is known to be more than 100 feet deep in certain areas. It’s a magnificent glacial lake nestled among rough-hewn mountain sides.

There is about a mile of sandy shoreline with a clearly marked swimming area at the beach. Restrooms, changing areas, and a snack stand are available in the big, historic granite bathhouse. On a calm day, the reflections of the fall trees on the water are breathtaking!

Stop #11

May Pond

Town: Barton, Vermont

Location: HERE

May Pond in Barton, Vermont, is a haven of peace and tranquility. With a surface area of 116 acres and a depth of 31 feet, this pond is great for a paddle to observe dragonflies dance on water lilies, hear frogs sing, and possibly spot a beaver. From mid-April to October, toss a line in pursuit of Brook Trout and Panfish from a gravel public boat launch. You’re sure to witness some spectacular foliage in September and October!

Stop #12

Bradley Covered Bridge

Town: Lyndon, Vermont

Location: HERE

The Bradley Covered Bridge in Lyndon, Vermont, is a historic covered bridge that spans Center Street over Miller Run, a tributary of the Passumpsic River. It is the last of Vermont’s many 19th-century covered bridges to carry a numbered state highway, having been built in 1878. The bridge is a single-span queenpost truss, 56.5 feet long and 17.5 feet wide, with a 15-foot roadway width. In 1977, the bridge was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Stop #13

Centre Covered Bridge

Town: Lyndon, Vermont

Location: HERE

The Centre Covered Bridge, also known as the Sanborn Covered Bridge, is a historic covered bridge that spans the Passumpsic River just north of Lyndon, Vermont, next to US Route 5. It was built in 1872, moved to its current location, and decommissioned in 1960. It is one of Vermont’s three remaining Paddleford truss bridges. The bridge is 118 feet long and 20 feet wide, with a metal roof with extremely long eaves.

In 1974, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

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